Cruises

AMT Cruise ship from aboveAMT cruises undertake biological, chemical and physical oceanographic research during the annual return passage of research ships between the UK and the Falkland Islands, South Africa or Chile, a distance of up to 13,500km.

The transect crosses a range of ecosystems from sub-polar to tropical and from euphotic shelf seas and upwelling systems to oligotrophic mid-ocean gyres.

The cruises have contributed to over 300 refereed publications and 75 PhD theses. AMT also provides training for the next generation of scientists.   

 

Expressions of interest are now invited for participation in future AMT cruises, please contact Andy Rees, apre@pml.ac.uk, for further details.

AMT26 has now finished, click here for information about the cruise
 

Life on board a research ship

The video below gives an insight in to what life is like on board the new RRS Discovery during a research cruise.
 

 


AMT1

The first AMT cruise took place from 21 September to 24 October 1995 on-board the RRS James Clark Ross. The ship sailed from Grimsby (UK) to Montevideo (Uruguay) and then continued on to Stanley (Falkland Islands).

During AMT1 a variety of instruments were used to map the physical, chemical, and biological structure of the upper 200m of the water column.  Ocean colour measurements were made using state-of-the-art sensors and new advances in fluorometry were used to measure photosynthetic activity, which was then used to further interpret primary productivity.  A unique set of samples and data were collected for the planktonic assemblages thoughout the transect. Data from the cruise was used as a primary input for basin-scale biological productivity models.


Personnel:

Cruise Departure Date Arrival Date Principal Scientist

Name

Institute

Bale, Anthony Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Gallienne, Chris Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hooker, Stan NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA
Marañón, Emilio Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Moore, Gerald Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Rees, Nigel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Robins, David (Principal Scientist) Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Spooner, Will Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Westbrook, Guy Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

AMT2

The AMT2 cruise took place between 22 April and 28 May 1996, when the RRS James Clark Ross sailed from the Falkland Islands to the UK.  The Principal Scientist was David Robins from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

The primary objective of the second AMT cruise was to investigate biological processes in the open Atlantic Ocean over very broad spatial scales. Specific objectives included:


Personnel:

Name

Institute

Bale, Anthony Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Doyle, John JRC, Italy
Fuller, Nick University of Warwick, UK
Gallienne, Chris Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Holligan, Patrick Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Marañón, Emilio Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Moore, Gerald Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Pomroy, Alan Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Reeder, Gavin University of Reading, UK
Rees, Nigel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Robins, David (Principal Scientist) Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Westbrook, Guy Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

AMT3

The objectives of the cruise remained similar to the first two transects, and included:

  • To improve our understanding of the relationship between physical processes and biological production
  • Identify, define and quantify latitudinal changes in biogeochemical provinces
  • Determine phytoplankton characteristics and photosynthetic parameters
  • Identify nutrient regimes and their role in biogeochemical cycles
  • Characterise plankton community structure, including the accurate determination of carbon values
  • Relate the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in surface waters with the biological production
  • Acquire data for the calibration of remotely sensed observations
  • Secondary validation of remotely sensed products
  • Interpret basin-scale remote sensing observations
  • Develop models that enable the interpretation of satellite imagery in terms of total water column properties

Personnel:

Name

Institute

Aiken, Jim Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Bale, Anthony Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Barlow, Ray Sea Fisheries Research Institute, South Africa
Bowie, Andy University of Plymouth, UK
Donlon, Craig JRC, Italy
Gallienne, Chris Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Griffiths, Colin Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hooker, Stan NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA
Huskin, Ignacio Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Law, Cliff Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Marañón, Emilio Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Mino, Yoshihisa Institute for Hydrosperic-Atmospheric Sciences, Japan
Mourino, Beatriz Universidad de Vigo, Spain
Nightingale, Tim Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK
Suzuki, Koji Nagoya University, Japan
Terayama, Yasunori Saga University, Japan
Zubkov, Mike University of Southampton

AMT4

The AMT4 cruise took place between 21 April and 27 May 1997, when the RRS James Clark Ross sailed from the Falkland Islands to the UK. The principal scientist was Tony Bale from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

The aims of the AMT4 cruise were similar to those of previous transects:

  • to improve our understanding of the relationship between physical processes and biological production
  • identify, define and quantify latitudinal changes in biogeochemical provinces
  • determine phytoplankton characteristics and photosynthetic parameters
  • identify nutrient regimes and their role in biogeochemical cycles
  • characterise plankton community structure, including the accurate determination of carbon values
  • relate the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in surface waters with the biological production
  • acquire data for the calibration of remotely sensed observations
  • secondary validation of remotely sensed products (eg. chlorophyll concentration)
  • interpret basin-scale remote sensing observations
  • develop models that enable the interpretation of satellite imagery in terms of total water column properties

     

Personnel:

Name

Institute

Bale, Anthony Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Carlier, Sylvie Universite de Lille1, France
Gallienne, Chris Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Gonzalez-Benitez, Natalia Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Griffiths, Colin Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hooker, Stan NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA
Huskin, Ignacio Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Moore, Gerald Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Pazo-Fernandez, Maria Jose Universidad de Vigo, Spain
Suggett, David Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Woodd-Walker, Rachel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Woodward, Malcolm Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Woolfenden, James Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Zubkov, Mike University of Southampton

AMT5

The AMT5 cruise took place between 14 September and 17 October 1997 when the RRS James Clark Ross sailed from the UK to the Falkland Islands.  The principal scientist was Jim Aiken from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

AMT5 was designated the SeaWiFS Atlantic Characterisation Experiment (SeaACE) and was the only major research cruise involved in the validation of SeaWiFS data during the first 100 days of operations.  This involved the near-real time reporting of in situ light and pigment observations to the SeaWiFS project, so the performance of the satellite sensor could be determined.


Personnel:

Name

Institute

Aiken, Jim Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Barciela-Fernandez, Rosa Universidad de Vigo, Spain
Berthon, Jean-François JRC, Italy
Cummings, Denise Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
de Vargas, Colomban Universite de Geneve, Switzerland
Dempsey, Cyril Satlantic Inc., Canada
Donlon, Craig JRC, Italy
Gibb, Stuart Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Gonzalez-Benitez, Natalia Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Hooker, Stan NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA
Huskin, Ignacio Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Law, Cliff Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
McKee, Conor University of East Anglia, UK
Quevedo, Mario Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Rees, Nigel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Suggett, David Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Wood, Peter University of Strathclyde, UK
Woodd-Walker, Rachel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Woodward, Malcolm Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Woolfenden, James Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

AMT6

AMT6 left Cape Town, South Africa on 14 May 1998 and arrived in Grimsby on 15 June 1998.  The ship track from Cape Town to the equator followed the coast of South Africa, Namibia and Angola to study the Benguela upwelling. From the coast of southern Angola, the track passed through the Gulf of Guinea to join the standard AMT track at about 10 degrees N. The principal scientists was Jim Aiken from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

The cruise focused on functional relationships of bio-optical properties and phytoplankton productivity in upwelling and highly productive ecosystems.


Personnel:

AMT6 personnel

 

Name

Institute

Aiken, Jim Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Barlow, Ray Sea Fisheries Research Institute, South Africa
Bowie, Andy University of Plymouth, UK
Brown, Jim University of Miami, USA
Dempsey, Cyril Satlantic Inc., Canada
Fernandez-Suarez, Emilio Universidad de Vigo, Spain
Holligan, Patrick Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Hooker, Stan NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA
Lucas, Mike University of Cape Town, South Africa
Pilgrim, Derek University of Plymouth, UK
Rees, Andy Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Robinson, Carol Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Serrett, Pablo Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Suggett, David Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Teira, Eva Universidad de Vigo, Spain
Tilstone, Gavin CSIC, Spain
Woodd-Walker, Rachel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

AMT6b

AMT6b took the usual AMT route from the Falkland Islands to the UK on the RRS Bransfield, with a small crew of three scientists. The aim of this additional cruise was to take the core measurements of the AMT programme, concentrating on underway data, with optics and XBT sampling where time and manpower allowed.

This is important for maintaining the long-term data collection ideals of the AMT programme, particularly in the Southern Ocean where AMT6, on the RRS James Clark Ross did not sample as it departed from Cape Town in South Africa.


Personnel:

Name

Institute

Moore, Gerald Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Moslempour, Tahmores Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Stringell, Thomas Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

AMT7

AMT7 left the UK on 14 September 1998 and arrived in the Falkland Islands on 25 October 1998.  The ship called at Lisbon as part of Expo 98, at Dakar for two scientists to disembark and in Montevideo where the majority of scientists left the ship.

The principal scientist was Jim Aiken from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory on the Portsmouth to Montevideo leg and Nigel Rees from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory from Montevideo to Stanley.


Personnel:

Name

Institute

Aiken, Jim Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Brown, Jim University of Miami, USA
Creamer, Tony NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA
Dempsey, Cyril Satlantic Inc., Canada
Donlon, Craig JRC, Italy
Dransfield, Leonie Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Gallienne, Chris Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hooker, Stan NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA
Kettle, Jamie Max Planck Institute, Germany
Lefevre, Nathalie Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Lucas, Mike University of Cape Town, South Africa
Medina-Ruiz, German Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Nightingale, Tim Rutherton Appleton Laboratory, UK
Poulton, Alex Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Rees, Nigel Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Rhee, Taehsiek Max Planck Institute, Germany
Suggett, David Southampton Oceanography Centre, Uk

AMT8

The AMT8 cruise took place between 25 April and 7 June 1999 when the RRS James Clark Ross sailed from the Falkland Islands to the UK, via Ascension Island. The principal scientist was Nigel Rees from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

The cruise was divided into three legs: Stanley-Montevideo, Montevideo-Ascension and Ascension-UK, each with different scientific objectives and activities.

On leg 1 the sampling strategy was tailored to investigate the structure of eddy systems within the Brazil/Falklands confluence.

The NASA optics team joined the cruise in Montevideo which resulted in the sampling strategy on legs 2 and 3 focusing on the acquisition of optical measurements and concurrent data on phytoplankton pigments and species, zooplankton, hydrographic properties, biogases and nutrients.


Personnel:

Name

Institute

Bonzon, Muriel Universite de Geneve, Switzerland
Boswell, Steve Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Creamer, Tony NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA
Dransfield, Leonie Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Gallienne, Chris Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hooker, Stan NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA
Jamerson, Greg Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Lazin, Gordana Dalhousie University, Canada
Poulton, Alex Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Rees, Nigel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Tyrell, Toby Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Westbrook, Guy Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Wright, Adrian Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Woodd-Walker, Rachel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

AMT9

AMT9 took place between 15 September and 13 October 1999 when the RRS James Clark Ross sailed from Grimsby in the UK to Montevideo, Uruguay. The principal scientist was Nigel Rees from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

The cruise aimed to develop links between the autonomous shipboard, towed measurements and satellite remote sensed observations by extrapolating measurements of the oceans and atmosphere from research ships to basin-scales.

The AMT9 cruise report is only available as a gangplank report (see links) which was produced on board by the principal scientist. There are no plans to produce a full AMT9 report.


Personnel:

Name

Institute

Chuck, Adele University of East Anglia, UK
Hughes, Joannah Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Kitidis, Vassilis University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
McKee, Conor University of East Anglia, UK
Rees, Nigel Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Sandford, Richard University of Plymouth, UK
Willson, Hester Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

AMT10

The AMT10 cruise took place from 12 April to 8 May 2000 sailing from Montevideo, Uruguay to Grimsby, UK on board the RRS James Clark Ross.  The principal scientist was Chris Gallienne from Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

During the cruise the ship was constrained in her ability to maintain station in any but the lightest winds. Nevertheless, the cruise produced a near-continuous set of surface underway data and samples taken at 23 stations over 24 days to measure the physical, biological and chemical properties of the euphotic zone.


Personnel:

Name

Institute

Gallienne, Chris Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Gent, D.-J. Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hill, Victoria Southampton Institute, UK
Kitidis, Vasillis University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Lens, Peter British Antarctic Survey, UK
Moore, Gerald Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Moore, Mark Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
O'Higgins, Tim Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Omachi, Claudia Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Poulton, Alex Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Stubbins, Aron University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Tagliabue, Alessandro Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Woodroffe, Paul British Antarctic Survey, UK

AMT11

The AMT11 cruse sailed onboard the RRS James Clark Ross from Grimsby, UK on 12 September 2000 and ended in Montevideo, Uruguay on 11 October 2000. The prinicipal scientist for the cruise was Malcolm Woodward from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

This cruise was different to previous AMT cruises in that it was coupled to a number of projects under the AMT banner. As well as core scientists from AMT there were two researchers from the Southampton Oceanography Centre carrying out meterological investigations as part of the Autoflux project, and the newly fitted Swath Bathymetry system was also being trialled and a survey was carried out in the Romanche Fracture Zone, part of the mid-Atlantic ridge system.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Castro, Begona Bacterial production and abundance Instituto Espanol de Oceanografía, Spain
Cunningham, Alex Swath bathymetry British Antarctic Survey, UK
Fernandez, Emilio Chlorophyll, primary production Universidade de Vigo, Spain
Isla, Alejandro Zooplankton respiration, ammonia production Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Kitidis, Vasillis Nutirents and DOM Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Lopes, Marcos Zooplankton biomass and grazing Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Mitchell, Neil Swath bathymetry Oxford University, UK
Omachi, Claudia FRRF Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Pascal, Robin Autoflux Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Serrett, Pablo Oxygen production and respiration Universidade de Vigo, Spain
Suggett, Dave Chlorophyll, CHN, fluorometry Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Thomalla, Sandy Chlorophyll, CHN Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Varela, Marta Nitrogen uptake Instituto Español de Oceanografía, Spain
Varela, Ramiro P-I curves, absorption characteristics Universidade de Vigo, Spain
Woodward, Malcolm Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Yelland, Margaret Autoflux Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK

AMT12

This was the first of a series of six AMT cruises funded by a NERC Consortium Grant. It sailed from Port Stanley, The Falklands on 12 May 2003 and docked in Grimsby, UK on 17 June 2003.  The principal scientist was Tim Jickells from the University of East Anglia, UK.

The cruise aimed to compare and contrast the functioning of the plankton in the north and south Atlantic gyres.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Bell, Tom DMS University of East Anglia, UK
Chamberlain, Katie Nutrients and pCO2 Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Forster, Grant N2O University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Gist, Niki Respiration and gross production Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hickman, Anna Pigments filterer Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Hodge, Catriona DON, PON Liverpool University, UK
Jickells, Tim Principal scientist University of East Anglia, UK
Lowe, Chris Optics, FRRF Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Lucas, Mike 13C/15N Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Millward, Nick Nitrogen fixation Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Mintrop, Ludger DIC, alkalinity, pCO2 Baltic Sea Research Institute, Germany
Moore, Gerald Optics, FRRF Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Nedelec, Florence Iron Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Painter, Stuart 13C/15N Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Poulton, Alex 14C size fractionated photosynthesis Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Robinson, Carol Respiration and photodegradation Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Robinson, Jenna CDOM University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Root, Sarah Pigments, DOC/N, POC/N, lugols Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
San Martin, Elena Zooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Statham, Peter Iron Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Thomalla, Sandy Thorium Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Woodward, Malcolm Nutrients and MVP Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

AMT13

This was the second in the series of cruises funded by a NERC Consortium Grant. The RRS James Clark Ross set sail from Immingham in the UK on 8 September 2003 and arrived in Stanley, Falkland Islands on 13 October 2003.  The principal scientist was Carol Robinson from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

The aims of the cruise were to sample the Mauritanian upwelling and southern gyre, thereby allowing data to be collected over a large range of plankton biomass, activity and community structure.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Baker, Alex Atmospheric deposition University of East Anglia, UK
Bell, Tom DMS University of East Anglia, UK
Clark, Darren Nitrification Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Forster, Grant Iron, N2O University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Fuchs, Bernard Bacterial processes Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany
Gist, Nicola Respiration and gross production Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Granda, Angelica Mesozooplankton Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Hampton, Paul Microzooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hind, Andy DIC, alkalinity, pCO2 University of East Anglia, UK
Johnson, Zackary Picoplankton Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Lavender, Samantha Optics University of Plymouth, UK
López, Eva Mesozooplankton Universidad de Oviedo, Spain
Lowe, Chris Optics, FRRF Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Millward, Nick Nitrogen fixation Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Poulton, Alex 14C size fractionated photosynthesis Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Robinson, Carol Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Robinson, Jenna CDOM, DIC, oxygen photodegradation University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
San Martin, Elena Zooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Stinchcombe, Mark Filtering, DOC/N Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Tarran, Glen Cytosub, flow cytometry Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Thomalla, Sandy Filtering and thorium Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Waldron, Howard 15N Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Woodward, Malcolm Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Zubkov, Mike Bacterial biodiversity Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK

AMT14

This was the third in the series of six AMT cruises funded by a NERC Consortium Grant.  The RRS James Clark Ross sailed from Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands on 28 April and arrived in the UK on 1 June 2004. The principal scientist was Prof. Patrick Holligan from the Southampton Oceanograpy Centre.

Extra ship time meant that AMT14 could take a more westerly route into towards the centre of the northern gyre than on previous AMT cruises.

The main objective of the cruise was to determine the trophic state of the planktonic ecosystem with respect to large scale patterns in the the ambient concentrations and supply to the surface waters of inorganic nutrients and of dissolved organic matter.

A NERC grant also enabled the first measurements of the standing stock and rates of formation of biogenic minerals (diatom silica and coccolithophore calcite) to be made on an AMT cruise. These measurements were used to provide a better understanding of the control of the biological pump.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Adey, Tim Autotrophic community structure Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Bell, Tom DMS University of East Anglia, UK
Biswas, Karabi Farhana Atmospheric sampling University of East Anglia, UK
Chamberlain, Katie Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Gist, Niki Respiration and gross production Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hampton, Paul Microzooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Harvey, Andrew Ammonium Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Heywood, Jane Microbial communities Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Hind, Andy DIC, alkalinity, pCO2 University of East Anglia, UK
Holligan, Patrick Principal Scientist Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Kim, Young Nam Autotrophic community structure Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Lowe, Chris Optics, FRRF Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Millward, Nick N2 fixation Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Painter, Stuart 15N, 13C Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Poulton, Alex 14C size fractionated photosynthesis Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Reynolds, Sarah Nitrogen isotopes, DON/DOP University of Liverpool, UK
Robinson, Jenna CDOM, DIC and oxygen photodegradation University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
San Martin, Elena Zooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Stinchcombe, Mark DOC/N Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Thomalla, Sandy Thorium University of Cape Town, South Africa
Zubkov, Mike Bacterial biodiversity Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK

AMT15

This was the fourth cruise of the funded by a NERC Consortium Grant. The cruise took place on board the RRS Discovery departing from Southampton, UK on 17 September 2004 and terminating in Cape Town, South Africa on 29 October 2004.

The major aim of the cruise was to investigate the upwelling waters off North Africa and to compare this with the less productive waters of the South Atlantic gyre.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Adey, Tim Calcification Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Atienza, Dacha Mesozooplankton Institut de Ciencies del Mar, Spain
Balch, Barney Calcification, optics Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, USA
Chamberlain, Katie Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Harrison, Elly Prochlorococcus diversity, viruses Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hay, Lorraine Optics, FRRF University of Strathclyde, UK
Henriksen, Casper Mesozooplankton Institut de Ciencies del Mar, Spain
Heywood, Jane Bacterial activity Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Hickman, Anna 14C Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Hind, Andy DIC, alkalinity, pCO2 University of East Anglia, UK
Millward, Nick Nitrogen fixation Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Pattenden, Abigail Filtering Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK
Peralba Marcó, Aurea Mesozooplankton Stazione Zoologica Anton Dorhn, Italy
Rees, Andy Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Serrett, Pablo Respiration and gross production Universidad de Vigo, Spain
Stubbins, Aron CDOM Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Ussher, Simon Iron University of Plymouth, UK
Waeles, Matthieu Atmospherics University of East Anglia, UK
Zwirglmaier, Katrin Synechococcus University of Warwick, UK

AMT16

This was the fifth cruise in the series funded by a NERC Consortium Grant.  The cruise was on board the RRS Discovery and sailed from Cape Town, South Africa to Falmouth, UK from 19 May to 29 June 2005.

The cruise aimed to compare the northern and southern hemisphere gyres following the 25 degree west meridian.  The coastal upwelling off south west Africa was investigated prior to steaming into the mid-Atlantic to head north.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Bale, Tony Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Chamberlain, Katie Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Cooke, Isobel Pigments, POC/N, lugols Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Drapeau, David Calcification, optics Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science, USA
Frickers, Trish pCO2, ammonia Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Gist, Niki Respiration and gross production Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hale, Michelle Bacterial processes Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada
Kaiser, Jan Oxygen, argon, nitrogen, CO2 Princeton University, USA
Koblizek, Michal Aerobic anoxygenic photoheterotrophs Instiute of Microbiology, Czech Republic
Lavender, Sam Optics, FRRF, CDOM University of Plymouth, UK
Mawji, Edward Marine siderophores University of Plymouth, UK
Pan, Xi DOC, DON, DOP National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Poulton, Alex 14C size fractionated photosynthesis National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Raitsos, Dionysios Data analysis University of Plymouth, UK
Reynolds, Sarah PON, DON University of Liverpool, UK
Schattenhofer, Martha Microbial community composition Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany
Tarran, Glen Flow cytometry Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Ussher, Simon Iron University of Plymouth, UK

AMT17

AMT17 was the sixth and final cruise of the second phase of the AMT programme, with a focus on the subtropical gyres of both the northern and southern hemispheres. The cruise sailed from Glasgow in the UK to Port Elizabeth in South Africa, from 15 October 2005 to 28 November 2005.  The track extended south west of the Azores into the subtropical gyre, and was similar to that for AMT14.

The main objectives of AMT17 were to acquire a consistent set of core measurements for comparison with data from earlier cruises, and to carry out new experimental work on planktonic processes relevant both to the AMT objectives and to future work at sea as part of a new marine biogeochemical projects. The latter included oxygen isotope measurements to assess the trophic balance within surface waters, measurements of the turnover rates of organic substrates by bacteria, and nutrient addition experiments to identify limiting substrates for phytoplankton growth.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Achterberg, Eric Iron siderophores National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Adey, Tim Calcification, 14C National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Bowler, Bruce Calcification, optics Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science, USA
Chamberlain, Katie Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Gist, Niki Respiration and gross production Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Hale, Michelle Bacterial processes Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada
Hickman, Anna Biological sampling National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Holligan, Patrick Principal Scientist National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Kaiser, Jan Underway oxygen, nitrogen, argon, CO2 Princeton University, USA
Lesworth, Tim Atmospheric sampling University of East Anglia, UK
Lucas, Mike 15N National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Mary, Isabelle Bacterial processes National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Mather, Rhiannon DOC, DON, PON University of Liverpool, UK
Mawji, Edward Marine siderophores University of Plymouth, UK
Mills, Matt Nutrient addition Stanford University, USA
Moore, Gerald Optics, FRRF, CDOM Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Moore, Mark Nutrient addition University of Essex, UK
Pan, Xi Pigments, DOC/N, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Pope, Nick DIC, pCO2 Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Suggett, Dave Nutrient addition University of Essex, UK
Ussher, Simon Iron University of Plymouth, UK
Weynberg, Karen Viruses Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Woodward, Malcolm Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Zubkov, Mike Bacterial processes National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

AMT18

This was the eighteenth in the series of Atlantic Meridional Transect cruises and was carried out on board the British Antarctic Survey research vessel, the RRS James Clark Ross.

The cruise sailed from Immingham in the UK on 4 October 2008 and ended in Port Stanley, Falkland Islands, on 10 November 2008.

This was the first of the series of AMT cruises funded through Theme 10b of the NERC Oceans 2025 science programme, which is a scientific collaboration between the Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.

Measurements taken on the cruise included hydrographic, chemical, ecological and optical data. Many of these measurements were made in underway mode (either via towed instruments or those connected to a sea water supply on board) with minimum personnel intervention. Depth profiles of temperature and salinity were taken daily, both pre-dawn and mid-morning usually to a maximum depth of 300m.  Boundaries between upper ocean water masses were determined by the position of current jets and compared with near real-time satellite images and upper ocean density measurements.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Bruce Bowler

Bowler, Bruce

Coccolithophores Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science, USA

Martine Couapel

Couapel, Martine

Coccolithophores Natural History Museum, UK

Chris Gallienne

Gallienne, Chris

Optics Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Carolyn Harris

Harris, Carolyn

Micronutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Manuela Hartman

Hartmann, Manuela

Microbial plankton National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Ross Holland

Holland, Ross

AFC National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Jo Hopkins

Hopkins, Jo

Physics National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Vasillis Kitidis

Kitidis, Vasillis

P:R Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Paul Mann

Mann, Paul

Ammonia University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Martin Ostrowski

Ostrowski, Martin

Picocyanobacteria University of Warwick, UK

Stuart Painter

Painter, Stuart

Nitrogen uptake National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Jon Pearman

Pearman, John

Picocyanobacteria University of Warwick, UK

Glen Tarran

Tarran, Glen

AFC Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Gavin Tilstone

Tilstone, Gavin

14C and CDOM Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Vera, Mario POGO-SCOR fellowship Universidad de la Republica, Uruguay

Malcolm Woodward

Woodward, Malcolm

Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Jeremy Young

Young, Jeremy

Coccolithophores Natural History Museum, UK

Mike Zubkov

Zubkov, Mike

Microbial plankton National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

AMT19

AMT19, the second in the series of cruises funded by the Oceans 2025 programme set sail from the UK on 13 October 2009 and arrived in Chile on 1 December 2009.  The principal scientist was Andy Rees from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

This was the longest voyage to date covering an immense 8500 miles continuing the long-term collection of biological and chemical observations of the remote Atlantic ecosystem. This included research examining the impact of ocean acidification on the activity of specific marine bacteria that are an important part of the global nitrogen cycle. New techniques were developed to determine concentration levels and microbial turnover of compounds that are important in atmospheric chemistry and provide a carbon source for marine bacteria and phytoplankton. Results from this research will increase our understanding of the processes that occur in the Atlantic Ocean and will eventually feed into ecosystem models to help forecast global change.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Rachel Beale

Beale, Rachael

OVOCs Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Marie Cheize

Cheize, Marie

Aerosol Fe speciation University of Brest, France

Giorgio Dall'Olmo

Dall'Olmo, Giorgio

Inherent optical properties Oregon State University, USA
Dixon, Joanna OVOCs Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK
Ferrera, Charissa Nitrogen cycling University of Philippines, Philippines

Chris Gallienne

Gallienne, Chris

Optics, zooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Carolina Grob

Grob, Carolina

Group specific C fixation University of Warwick, UK

Carolyn Harris

Harris, Carolyn

Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Manuela Hartmann

Hartmann, Manuela

Algal mixotrophy National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK
Herrington, Sian DOP turnover National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Ross Holland

Holland, Ross

Flow cytometry National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Emily Lysczkowski

Lysczkowski, Emily

Coccolithophore RS Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, USA

Martin Ostrowski

Ostrowski, Martin

Picocyanobacteria University of Warwick, UK

Stuart Painter

Painter, Stuart

Physical oceanography National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Andy Rees

Rees, Andy

Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Sophie Richier

Richier, Sophie

Metabolic proteins National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Libby Ross

Ross, Libby

Shrimp, physical oceanography National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Stephanie Sargeant

Sargeant, Stephanie

OVOCs Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

John Stephens

Stephens, John

P:R Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Glen Tarran

Tarran, Glen

Flow cytometry Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Kevin Tempest

Tempest, Kevin

Noble gases University of Washington, USA

Claire Widdecombe

Widdecombe, Claire

Primary production Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Neil Wyatt

Wyatt, Neil

Fe/N fixation Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Jodi Young

Young, Jodi

Coccolithophore biogeography University of Oxford, UK

Mike Zubkov

Zubkov, Mike

Microbial activity National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

AMT20

The twentieth AMT cruise will set sail from Southampton in the UK on 12 October 2010 and is due to arrive in Chile on 25 November. The cruise will focus on microbial diversity and activity, physical oceanography, optics, analytical flow cytometry and primary production and coloured dissolved organic matter. The principal scientist will be Andy Rees from Plymouth Marine Laboratory.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Dave Aldridge

Aldridge, Dave

Microplankton National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Ella Darlington

Darlington, Ella

Outreach/education Education through Expeditions

Dave Drapeau

Drapeau, Dave

Calcite remote sensing Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, USA

Maeve Eason-Hubbard

Eason-Hubbard, Maeve

Mechanisms of carbon assimilation University of Oxford, UK

Mike Fraser

Fraser, Mike

Nitrogen fixation Dalhousie University, USA

Chris Gallienne

Gallienne, Chris

Optics, zooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Johanna Gloel

Gloel, Johanna

Community production University of East Anglia, UK

Paola Gomez-Pereira

Gomez-Pereira, Paola

Microbial ecology National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Imke Grefe

Grefe, Imke

N2O University of East Anglia

Carolina Grob

Grob, Carolina

Picoplankton University of Warwick, UK

Rachel Harmer

Harmer, Rachel

Zooplankton, MAAs Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Carolyn Harris

Harris, Carolyn

Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Manuela Hartmann

Hartmann, Manuela

Algal mixotrophy National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Ross Holland

Holland, Ross

Flow cytometry National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Barbora Hoskova

Hoskova, Barbora

Ocean acidification Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

Monika Kowalczuk

Kowalczuk, Monika

CDOM remote sensing Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

Joseph Nissimov

Nissimov, Joseph

Viruses Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Raf Nobili

Nobili, Raf

Zooplankton metabolism University of East Anglia, UK

Andy Rees

Rees, Andy

Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

John Stephens

Stephens, John

P:R Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Glen Tarran

Tarran, Glen

Flow cytometry Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Rob Thomas

Thomas, Rob

Data management and instrument calibration British Oceanographic Data Centre, UK

Gavin Tilstone

Tilstone, Gavin

Primary production Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Monika Zablocka

Zablocka, Monika

CDOM remote sensing Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

Mike Zubkov

Zubkov, Mike

Microbial activity National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

AMT21

The AMT21 cruise set sail from Avonmouth in the UK on 29 September 2011 and arrived in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14 November. The principal scientist was Glen Tarran from Plymouth Marine Laboratory.


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Maria Aranguren-Gassis

Aranguren-Gassis, Maria

P:R Universidade de Vigo, Spain

Amanda Beesley

Beesley, Amanda

Nutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Christin Bennke

Bennke, Christin

Bacterioplankton diversity and activity MPI, Bremen, Germany

Karolina Borzyck

Borzyck, Karolina

CDOM Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

Denise Cummings

Cummings, Denise

Primary production Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Rob Ellis

Ellis, Rob

Chlorophyll calibration, outreach Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Chris Gallienne

Gallienne, Chris

Optics, zooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Francisca Garcia

Garcia, Francisca

Heterotrophic bacteria Spainish Institute of Oceanography, Spain

Elena García-Martín

García-Martín, Elena

P:R Universidade de Vigo, Spain

Polly Hill

Hill, Polly

Photoheterotrophy National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Ross Holland

Holland, Ross

Flow cytometry National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Vas Kitidis

Kitidis, Vas

Carbon chemistry Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Laura Lubelczyk

Lubelczyk, Laura

Coccolithophore remote sensing Bigelow Institute for Ocean Sciences, USA

Cristina Moraru

Moraru, Cristina

Bacterioplankton diversity and activity MPI, Bremen, Germany

Mari Munoz Marin

Munoz Marin, Mari

Prochlorococcus heterotrophy Universidad de Córdob, Spain

Joe Snow

Snow, Joe

Metabolic proteins, nitrogen fixation National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Glen Tarran

Tarran, Glen

Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Rob Thomas

Thomas, Rob

Data management and instrument calibration British Oceanographic Data Centre, UK

Chan Yodle

Yodle, Chan

Aerosol nutrients University of East Anglia, UK

Alaa Younes

Younes, Alaa

POGO Fellow, primary production NIOF, Egypt

Monika Zablocka

Zablocka, Monika

CDOM Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

AMT22

The AMT22 cruise set sail from Southampton in the UK on 10 October 2012 and arrived in Punta Arenas, Chile on 24 November 2012. The principal scientist was Glen Tarran from Plymouth Marine Laboratory

The cruise took measurements by autonomous instrumentation in parallel with the ship observations.
  
A NASA overflight took place during the cruise, with which the data from AMT was used to provide important validation. The aim of the flight was to increase the capability of the airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar in relation to ocean ecosystems, air-sea gas exchange and ocean-aerosol interactions. The flight was used to improve the functionality of the Research Scanning Polarimeter which measures the properties of aerosols and clouds. Argo floats from the Met Office and Villefrance were also deployed and gliders from Rutgers University followed similar cruise tracks.

Download the AMT 22 Cruise Report (pdf)


Personnel:

Name

Role

Institute

Amann Rudi

Amann, Rudi

Bacteria, molecular identification Max Planck Institute, Bremen, Germany

Christaki, Urania

Christaki, Urania

Microbial ecology LOG, Wimereux, France

Sara Cregeen

Cregeen, Sara

Microbial ecology National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Georgio Dall'Olmo

Dall 'Olmo, Giorgio

Plankton biomass/optics Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Chris Gallienne

Gallienne, Chris

Optics, zooplankton Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Erica Goetze

Goetze, Erica

Zooplankton genetics University of Hawai`i at Manoa, USA

Sina Hackenberg

Hackenberg, Sina

Terpene emissions University of York, UK

Carolyn Harris

Harris, Carolyn

Micronutrients Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Vas Kitidis

Kitidis, Vas

Carbon chemistry Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Priscila Lange

Lange, Priscila

SCOR/POGO student Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, Bermuda

Jose Lozano

Lozano, Jose

Oxygen, GPP-NPP Universidade de Vigo, Spain

Laura Lubelczyk

Lubelczyk, Laura

Coccolithophore remote sensing Bigelow Institute for Ocean Sciences, USA

Katja Peijnenburg

Peijnenburg, Katja

Zooplankton University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Fran Pitt

Pitt, Fran

Picoplankton genomic diversity University of Warwick, UK

Liam Pollard

Pollard, Liam

Aerosols/pigment filtering/blog University of East Anglia

Kristen Reifel

Reifel, Kristen

Plankton biomass/optics Oregon State University, USA

Greta Reintjes

Reintjes, Greta

Bacteria, molecular identification Max Planck Institute, Bremen, Germany

Martha Schattenhofer

Schattenhofer, Martha

Bacteria, molecular identification Max Planck Institute, Bremen, Germany

Pablo Serret

Serret, Pablo

Oxygen, GPP-NPP Universidade de Vigo, Spain

Glen Tarran

Tarran, Glen

Principal Scientist Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Rob Thomas

Thomas, Rob

Chlorophyll and data management British Oceanographic Data Centre, UK

Gavin Tilstone

Tilstone, Gavin

14C and CDOM Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Virginie van Dongen-Vogels

van Dongen-Vogels, Virginie

Plankton biomass/optics Oregon State University, USA

Natalie Wager

Wager, Natalie

N20/CH4 University of East Anglia, UK

Joerg Wulf

Wulf, Joerg

Bacteria, molecular identification Max Planck Institute, Bremen, Germany

Mingxi Yang

Yang, Mingxi

OVOCs Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Mike Zubkov

Zubkov, Mike

Microbial activity, AFC National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

AMT23

The 23rd AMT Cruise departed the UK from Immingham on the 7th October 2013 on board the RRS James Clark Ross, and arrived in Port Stanley, Falkland Islands on the 8th November 2013.  

The Principal Scientist was Mike Zubkov.
 

Download the Cruise Report for AMT 23 (7mb pdf)

 

A list of cruise participants (and institutions) are detailed below:


Personnel:

 

Arwen Bargery BODC
Bob Brewin PML
Ian Brown PML
Giorgio Dall'Olmo PML
Claire Evans NOC
Sina Hackenberg Univ of York
Carolyn Harris PML
Phyllis Lam NOC
Priscilla Lange NOC
Jose Lorenzo Vigo
Jamie Minaeian Univ of York
Ankita Misra POGO Fellow
Mónica Moniz Univ of Warwick
Fran Pitt Univ of Warwick
Andy Rees PML
Glen Tarran PML
Gavin Tilstone PML
Natalie Wager UEA
Mike Zubkov NOC

AMT24

The twenty-fourth research cruise in the Atlantic Meridional Transect series, between the UK and the Falkland Islands, and funded by NERC National Capability, has been successfully completed. AMT24 set sail from Immingham on 22nd September aboard the British Antarctic Survey vessel James Clark Ross, and arrived in Stanley on 2nd November 2014.

 

The highlights of the cruise are as follows:

  • Launch of 5 Bio-Argo floats, purchased as part of a successful NERC Capital bid by PML, in the sparsely sampled remote tropical Atlantic;
  • Launch of 8 Argo floats on behalf of the UK Met Office in the tropical and south Atlantic;
  • Recovery of two deep (5000 m) sediment trap moorings in the South Atlantic Gyre for NOC, which had previously been deployed in October 2012 and May 2014, and the construction and deployment of a single sediment trap mooring at the same location. The entire operation was achieved in less than 30 hours;
  • Automated process, partly developed and designed on AMT24, to seamlessly send coarse resolution CTD data to the UK Met Office for assimilation into atmosphere / ocean forecasts;
  • Seventy CTD profiles at stations spaced approximately 200 nM apart measuring key physical and biogeochemical parameters including: temperature, salinity, chlorophyll, oxygen, nutrients, pH, alkalinity, N20, CH4, phytoplankton and zooplankton abundance, primary production, respiration, genetics and microbial dynamics;
  • Thousands of underway bio-optical and biogeochemical measurements covering a 100° range in latitude and vastly contrasting ocean biomes;
  • Continuous operation of acoustic sensors to continuously calculate biomass;
  • Twice daily trawls of a range of nets to determine the abundance of different species of zooplankton;
  • Marine grade extended endurance testing of hyperspectral spectrometers designed to accurately determine direct and diffuse irradiance. This was part of an industrial partnership with Peak Design Ltd.;
  • Participation of 24 research scientists from 13 institutes (UK, Netherlands, USA)

The image above shows the route taken by the cruise including sampling at the North and South Atlantic Gyre. The yellow points are stations, red points are Met Office floats, green points are PML bio-Argo floats and the ‘M’ symbol is a mooring.


Personnel:


Name

 

 

Affiliation

Tim Smyth

 

 

PML

Carolyn Harris

 

 

PML

Gavin Tilstone

 

 

PML

Giorgio D'all Olmo

 

 

PML

Glen Tarran

 

 

PML

Ian Brown

 

 

PML

Mike Zubkov

 

 

NOC

Priscilla Lange

 

 

U.Oxford / NOC

Sara Cregeen

 

 

NOC

Catherine Burd

 

 

NOC / U Soton

Moritz Machelett

 

 

U Soton / NOC

Gabrielle Kennaway

 

 

NHM

Nina Kamennaya

 

 

U Warwick / NOC

Erica Goetze

 

 

Hawaii

Michelle Jungbluth 

 

 

Hawaii

Alice Burridge

 

 

Amsterdam

Ryan Pereira

 

 

Newcastle

Bita Sabbaghzadeh

 

 

Newcastle

Laura Lubelczyk

 

 

Bigelow

Monica Moniz

 

 

Warwick

Jose Lozano

 

 

Vigo

Jelizaveta Ross

 

 

PML

Rob Thomas

 

 

BODC

Rafael Jose Rasse Boada

 

 

Venezuela


AMT25

AMT25 set sail from Immingham on 15th September aboard the British Antarctic Survey vessel the RRS James Clark Ross and arrived in Stanley, Falkland Islands on 3rd November 2015.

The highlights of AMT25 were as follows:

  • Eighty-one CTD profiles at stations spaced approximately 200nM apart measuring key physical and biogeochemical parameters including: temperature, salinity, chlorophyll, oxygen, nutrients, total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, phytoplankton abundance and microbial dynamics;
  • Thousands of underway bio-optical and biogeochemical measurements covering a 100° range in latitude and vastly contrasting ocean biomes;
  • Underway radiometry combined with hyperspectral in-water Inherent Optical Property measurements, particularly pertinent for satellite calibration validation. Both hyperspectral and multi-spectral data were taken independently;
  • Launch of 7 Argo floats, on behalf of the UK and German Met Offices, in the tropical and south Atlantic;
  • Recovery a deep (5000m) sediment trap mooring in the South Atlantic Gyre for NOC, which had previously been deployed in October 2014 (AMT24) and the construction and deployment of a single sediment trap mooring at the same location. The entire operation was achieved in less than 18 hours;
  • Automated processing chain, partly developed and designed on AMT24/25, to seamlessly send coarse resolution CTD data to the UK Met Office for assimilation into atmosphere/ocean forecasts. Of particular interest was the real-time ingestion to FOAM of a deep CTD cast (>5000m) in the northern Atlantic;
  • Continuous operation of acoustic sensors to probe positions of marine creatures;
  • Continuous swath bathymetry and ADCP data;

 

The image shows the AMT25 track overlaid by NEODAAS satellite products provided during the expedition. From top to bottom: VIIRS chlorophyll, AVHRR SST, VIIRS euphotic depth and VIIRS chlorophyll.



Personnel:


Name

Institution

Arwen Bargery

BODC

Carolina Beltran

Lisbon University

Kimberley Bird

MBA

Robert Brewin

PML

Catherine Burd

NOC

Giorgio Dall'Olmo

PML

Priscila Lange

NOC

Catherine Mitchell

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Bita Sabbaghzadeh

Newcastle University

Charlotte Smith

Liverpool University

Tim Smyth

PML (PI)

Glen Tarran

PML

Robyn Tuerena

PML


Horizon of open sea at sunset

AMT26

AMT26 set sail from Immingham on 20th September 2016 aboard the British Antarctic Survey vessel the RRS James Clark Ross and arrived in Stanley, Falkland Islands on 4th November 2016.
 

This years cruise had the addition of funding from the European Space Agency for the AMT4SentinelFRM project. This will provide a unique opportunity to obtain high quality fiducial reference measurements for the validation of Sentinel products in a wide range of Atlantic locations.

You can read more about life on board the ship from Madeline Steer, who is working with marine plastics.  Click here to view her blog posts on the Plymouth Marine Laboratory Facebook page.


Download the full cruise report (7MB) <


Personnel:

Name

Institution

Andy Rees (PI)

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

James Ayliffe

British Oceanographic Data Centre

Bob Brewin

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Kerri Coombes

Plymouth Marine Laboratory/University of Plymouth

Denise Cummings

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Giorgio Dall'Olmo

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Carolyn Harris

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Jason Hopkins

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Francesco Nencioli

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Emanuele Organelli

Marie Curie fellow

Katsia Pabortsava

National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

Rafaell Rasse

Royal Society fellow

Madeline Steer

Plymouth Marine Laboratory/University of Plymouth

Glen Tarran

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Werenfrid Wimmer

University of Southampton

AMT27

This years cruise will depart from Southampton on the 21st September 2017 on board the RRS Discovery and arrive in the Falklands on 5th November 2017.

Please check back for further updates about the cruise.


Personnel:

TBC